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Postcards > Thematics > Antarctica

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Item 207213    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Queen's Flag 88° 23'S. 162°E.

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. The Nimrod Expedition. Shackleton. Snow Snowy Ground. British Flag. Great Britain. Union Jack. Farthest South, Queen's Flag Hoisted Lat. 88° 23'S., Long 162°E. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£94.99€123.49US$128.24
Item 207212    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Ernest Joyce Dog Dogs Penguins

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. The Nimrod Expedition. Shackleton. Snow Snowy Ground. Animals. Ernest Joyce, Dog Dogs and Penguin Penguins. Ernest Edward Mills Joyce AM (c. 1875 – 1940) was a Royal Naval seaman and explorer who participated in 4 Antarctic expeditions during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration, in the early 20th century. He served under both Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£74.99€97.49US$101.24
Item 207211    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Horses Ponies on Arrival Sleds

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. The Nimrod Expedition. Shackleton. Animals. Snow Snowy Ground. Sled Sledge Sleigh. Horse Pony Horses Ponies on Arrival in Antarctic. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£74.99€97.49US$101.24
Item 207209    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-9 Old Postcard Dr Alistair Forbes McKay Mackay

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. Shackleton, Nimrod. Snow Snowy Ground. Rucksack Backpack. Ax. Alistair Forbes Mackay Smoking Pipe. Dr. Forbes McKay. Alistair Forbes Mackay was a Scottish doctor and polar explorer. He was one of the trio of explorers, along with Douglas Mawson and Professor Edgeworth David, that became the first humans to reach the South Magnetic Pole. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£94.99€123.49US$128.24
Item 207208    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Union Jack South Magnetic Pole

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. Shackleton, Nimrod. Snow Snowy Ground. British Flag. Union Jack Hoisted at South Magnetic Pole. Alistair Forbes Mackay (Scottish doctor and polar explorer), Douglas Mawson and Professor Edgeworth David, the first humans to reach the South Magnetic Pole. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£94.99€123.49US$128.24
Item 207207    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Dogs, Return of Southern Party

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. Shackleton, Nimrod. Dog Dogs. The Return of The Southern Party. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£94.99€123.49US$128.24
Item 207206    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Summit of Mount Erebus 13350ft

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. Shackleton, Nimrod. Snowy Mountains. The Summit of Mount Erebus 13,350 ft. High. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£34.99€45.49US$47.24
Item 207205    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard S.Y. Nimrod in Floe Ice - SHIP

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. Shackleton, Nimrod. Shipping. Sailing Boat Ship Schooner. S.Y. Nimrod in Floe Ice. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£44.99€58.49US$60.74
Item 207204    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Winter Quarters and Mt. Erebus

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. Shackleton, Nimrod. Snowy Mountains. Winter Quarters Mountain Mount Mt. Erebus in distance. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£74.99€97.49US$101.24
Item 207203    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Emperor Penguins E. Shackleton

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09. Nimrod, Shackleton. Emperor Penguins. Penguin Animals. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£29.99€38.99US$40.49
Item 207202    
British Antarctic Expedition 1907-09 Old Postcard Southern Depot Party with Dogs

Vintage Old Original Postcard. The British Antarctic Expedition 1907-1909, Shackleton, Nimrod. Southern Depot Party with Dogs. Sled Sledge Sleigh. British Antarctic Expedition, The Nimrod Expedition of 1907–09, was the first of 3 expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole.

Price:£44.99€58.49US$60.74
Item 205391    
British Antarctic Expedition 1912 Postcard At South Pole Roald Amundsen's Tent

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, aboard "Terra Nova". / At the South Pole, from left to right : Edward Wilson, Robert Falcon Scott, Edgar Evans, L.E.G. Oates, Henry Bowers, with Roald Amundsen's tent behind them, 17th January 1912. Photograph by H.R. Bowers. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£14.99€19.49US$20.24
Item 205389    
Scott's Antarctic Expedition 1912 Postcard - Roald Amundsen's Tent at South Pole

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, aboard "Terra Nova". / Scott's Party at the South Pole with Roald Amundsen's tent in the background, 18 January 1912, from left to right : Robert Falcon Scott, L.E.G. Oates, Edward Wilson, and Edgar Evans. Photograph by H.R. Bowers. Skies. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£14.99€19.49US$20.24
Item 196191    
South Georgia Solitary Leopard Seal C. Gilbert British Antarctic Survey Postcard

Larger Colour Postcard, Animal, Solitary Leopard Seal on Ice at South Georgia. Photographed by BAS Photographer Chris Gilbert. British Antarctic Survey. Natural Environment Research Council. South Georgia, British overseas territory in the southern Atlantic Ocean.
Published by Labute Limited NERC-BAS

Price:£9.99€12.99US$13.49
Item 194619    
British Antarctic Expedition 1912 Postcard - Roald Amundsen's Tent at South Pole

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, aboard "Terra Nova". / Scott's Party at the South Pole with Roald Amundsen's tent in the background, 18 January 1912, from left to right : Robert Falcon Scott, L.E.G. Oates, Edward Wilson, and Edgar Evans. Photograph by H.R. Bowers. Skies. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£14.99€19.49US$20.24
Item 194615    
Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1912 Postcard At South Pole Amundsen's Tent

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, aboard "Terra Nova". / At the South Pole, from left to right : Edward Wilson, Robert Falcon Scott, Edgar Evans, L.E.G. Oates, Henry Bowers, with Roald Amundsen's tent behind them, 17th January 1912. Photograph by H.R. Bowers. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£14.99€19.49US$20.24
Item 194612    
Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition Postcard Endurance Crushed DOGS

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / The End. The Endurance crushed, with dogs looking on 1915. Photograph by Frank Hurley. Ship, Boat. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£7.99€10.39US$10.79
Item 194611    
Shackleton's Trans-Antarctic Expedition Postcard Whaleboat, Relaying James Caird

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / Relaying the James Caird across the ice, 1915. Photograph by Frank Hurley. Whaleboat. Boat. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£7.99€10.39US$10.79
Item 194607    
Shackleton Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1915 Postcard Endurance at Night Side View

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / Endurance at Night (side View), 1915. Photograph by Frank Hurley. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£7.99€10.39US$10.79
Item 194479    
British ANTARCTIC Expedition 1911 Postcard 1910-1913 CAPTAIN ROBERT FALCON SCOTT

Modern Reproduction Photo Picture Postcard, Sledge. British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, Led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott. By Photographer Herbert Ponting 13th April 1911. In 1910 Scott set out on his fateful expedition to the South Pole. He reached his goal on the 18th January 1912. / Had we lived, I should have had a tale to tell of the hardihood, endurance, and courage of my companions which would have stirred the heart of every Englishman. - Robert Falcon Scott, Message to the Public, c.29 March 1912.
Published by RGS

Price:£14.99€19.49US$20.24
Item 175061    
Scott's Antarctic Expedition Postcard Southern Party Return Captain Scott, Group

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, aboard "Terra Nova". / Captain Scott and Group, taken on return of Southern Party, 13th April 1911. Photograph by Herbert Ponting. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£5.99€7.79US$8.09
Item 175048    
Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1915 Postcard The End Endurance Crushed DOGS

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / The End. The Endurance crushed, with dogs looking on 1915. Photograph by Frank Hurley. Ship, Boat. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
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Price:£7.99€10.39US$10.79
Item 175046    
Antarctic Expedition 1916 Postcard About to be Rescued After 22 Months - Yelcho

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / About to be rescued after 22 months, with the Yelcho in the distance, 30th August 1916. Photograph by Frank Hurley. Ice. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
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Price:£3.99€5.19US$5.39
Item 175043    
Shackleton Trans-Antarctic Expedition Postcard Playing Football on Ice 1914-1917

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / Playing Football on the Ice. Photograph by Frank Hurley. Sport, Sports. Ship, Boat. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
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Price:£4.99€6.49US$6.74
Item 175042    
Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition Postcard Dr. Leonard Hussey Samson Dog, Dogs

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / Dr. Leonard Hussey lifting Samson with an unidentified dog alongside. Photograph by Frank Hurley. Dogs. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
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Price:£5.99€7.79US$8.09
Item 174980    
British ANTARCTIC Expedition 13. April 1911 Postcard CAPTAIN ROBERT FALCON SCOTT

Modern Reproduction Photo Picture Postcard, 10.2cm x 15.2cm. Sledge. British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, Led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott. By Photographer Herbert Ponting 13th April 1911. In 1910 Scott set out on his fateful expedition to the South Pole. He reached his goal on the 18th January 1912. / Had we lived, I should have had a tale to tell of the hardihood, endurance, and courage of my companions which would have stirred the heart of every Englishman. - Robert Falcon Scott, Message to the Public, c.29 March 1912.
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Price:£14.99€19.49US$20.24
Item 167357    
Antarctic Expedition 1914-17 Postcard Dr. Leonard Hussey lifting Samson Dog Dogs

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / Dr. Leonard Hussey lifting Samson with an unidentified dog alongside. Photograph by Frank Hurley. Dogs. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
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Price:£5.99€7.79US$8.09
Item 167354    
Shackleton Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1915 Postcard Endurance at Night

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917, aboard "Endurance". / Endurance at Night (side View), 1915. Photograph by Frank Hurley. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
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Price:£7.99€10.39US$10.79
Item 167349    
Scott British Antarctic Expedition Terra Nova 1912 Postcard Sledge Polar Plateau

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, aboard "Terra Nova". / On the Polar Plateau 1912, from left to right : Edgar Evans, L.E.G. Oates, Edward Wilson, and Robert Falcon Scott on skis and pulling a sledge. Photograph by H.R. Bowers. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
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Price:£4.99€6.49US$6.74
Item 167338    
Antarctic Expedition 1911 Postcard Captain Scott & Group - Southern Party Return

Modern Reproduced Oversized Picture Postcard. approx. 16.5cm x 12.2cm. Scott's British Antarctic Expedition 1910-1913, aboard "Terra Nova". / Captain Scott and Group, taken on return of Southern Party, 13th April 1911. Photograph by Herbert Ponting. The Quest for the South Port. During the early 20th century's "Heroic Age" of Antarctic exploration, 4 British expeditions set sights on reaching the South Pole. The British National Antarctic Expedition of 1901-1904, led by naval officer Robert Falcon Scott aboard the ship "Discovery", came within 857km (463 nautical miles) of the pole and laid the ground for future scientific research in Antarctica. Ernest Shackleton, who had been a member Scott's expedition, then organized and led the British Antarctic Expedition (1907-1909) in hopes of being first to the pole. Reaching Antarctica aboard the "Nimrod", this expedition came within 180km (97 nautical miles) of its goal before turning back due to harsh weather, poor rations, and physical weakness. Nevertheless, expedition members were the first to reach the polar plateau, first to ascent Mount Erebus, and first to reach the South Magnetic Pole. (Shackleton's "Furthest South" record would stand until the Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen reached Geographic South Pole in December 1911). In 1910 Scott embarked on a second expedition, aboard the "Terra Nova". Using Shackleton's route across the plateau, this expedition aimed to reach the South Pole and undertake further scientific research and exploration. The expedition accomplished its scientific goals and mapped Victoria Land and the Western Mountains. But when Scott and a small team reached the South Pole, they discovered that Amundsen had beaten them there by one month. Tragically, they all died on the return journey. Shackleton's next effort, the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-1917 aboard the "Endurance", set out to be the first to cross Antarctica. But the Endurance was destroyed by ice, and the 28 men endured 22 months in the Antarctic, isolated with poor food supplies at temperature below -37C (-35F). Eventually, Shackleton and a crew of 6 went for help in a small whaleboat, the "James Caird". Crossing 800 nautical miles of the treacherous Southern Ocean, Shackleton completed one of history's most remarkable voyages, returning within months to rescue his stranded crew. The Quest for the South Pole celebrates the achievement of all 4 expeditions through dramatic photographs taken by, among others, the distinguished photographers Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. These images reflect the bravery and determination of the expeditionary teams and capture a sense of the Antarctic's majestic natural beauty.
Published by RGS

Price:£5.99€7.79US$8.09